General

What is genital herpes in pregnancy?

What is genital herpes in pregnancy?

Genital Herpes in Pregnancy

· 60 percent of people with sexually transmitted Genital Herpes virus are unaware that they carry it!

· Once the virus enters the human body, it continues to live inside the cells, causing repeated infections at different times!

· Genital Herpes, which affects everyone who is sexually active, can easily spread from partner to partner

Painful itchy blisters, lumps affecting the genital area, rashes and pain during urination are the first classic symptoms of HSV type 2. The disease is accompanied by symptoms such as fever, weakness, and swelling of the lymph nodes. These symptoms are pain, blisters and red, swollen-filled swellings that last for 10 to 15 days. Genital Herpes is a virus infection caused by Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) that affects everyone who is sexually active. There are two types of HSV type 1 and type 2. In particular, type 2 affects the genital area, anus, hip, and type 1 usually affects the mouth, face and lips.

Genital Herpes in Pregnancy

There is no reason why women with genital herpes should not become pregnant or give birth successfully. If genital herpes has been identified, especially before the mother becomes pregnant or in the early stages of pregnancy, the risk of transmitting the infection to the newborn is low. If the mother receives genital HSV in the last three months of pregnancy, the risk of neonatal herpes in infants reaches the highest level. This is due to the fact that the newly infected mother is unable to produce sufficient antibodies against the virus, thus providing little natural protection for the baby before and after birth. In addition, newly acquired genital HSV infection is usually active, so that the virus will be present in the birth canal at birth. Even in cases where HSV infection is encountered during the last period of pregnancy, specialists may also take preventive measures, such as recommending a caesarean section and / or prescribing antiviral treatment. All pregnant women with genital herpes or women planning pregnancy should consult with their family doctor and obstetrician.

60 percent of people with sexually transmitted Genital Herpes virus are unaware that they carry it!

No signs and symptoms are seen in 20% of HSV-2 infected individuals, and they are not aware of the presence of the virus. Likewise, in 60% of infected patients, the findings are so mild and atypical that patients do not notice that they carry the virus.1

Herpes simplex viruses (HSV-1 and HSV-2), which cause both genital and facial herpes, are estimated to affect more than 50% of the world's population.3 In some regions of the world 8 of 10 people carry one of these two viruses.4 according to a published study, the prevalence of this virus in Turkey, 90% oranındadır.6

Genital Herpes, which affects everyone who is sexually active, can easily be transmitted from partner to partner.

Genital herpes diseases caused by HSV type 2 can be transmitted by mouth-to-mouth, oral-to-genital and genital-to-genital contact. There is no need for symptoms to transmit the disease; that is, the disease can be transmitted from partner to partner while asymptomatic.

Once the virus enters the human body, it continues to live inside the cells, causing repeated infections at different times!

Genital herpes is a sexually transmitted disease, but recent advances in the treatment of this condition have provided valuable information to reduce the risk of passing on to sexual partners.

Genital Herpes Treatment Methods:

Antiviral Treatment

Antiviral treatment is very effective in reducing the frequency, severity and duration of exacerbations of the disease. This may take several days at the first appearance of exacerbation. Alternatively, for those who wish to prevent exacerbations or to reduce the viral spread between exacerbations, treatment may be maintained daily for several months or years (suppression therapy).

References:

1. Corey L. The Current Trend in Genital Herpes. Progress in Prevention. Sex Transmitted Diseases 1994; 21 (suppl 2): ​​pS38-S44
2. Corey LC, Wald A, Patel R et al. Once-daily valacyclovir to reduce the risk of transmission of genital herpes. N Engl J Med 2004; 350: 11-20
3. International Herpes Week campaign 2004
4. Smith JS, Hopkins J, Robinson NJ. Seroprevalence of HSV-2 and HSV-1 Infections in the United States and Europe. Abstract presented at Eurogin, April 2003
5. Corey LC, Wald A, Patel R et al. Once-daily valacyclovir to reduce the risk of transmission of genital herpes. N Engl J Med 2004; 350: 11-20
6. Dollar N et al. Seroprevalance of herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 in Turkey. JEADV 2006, 20, 1232-1236

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